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Whole House Water Filtration Systems

Water Filter System Installation
filter system To install a whole house water filter, determine where the best location will be for the filter. Take into consideration the filter will need to be in a location easy to access and where adequate room is available for the filter sump (filter cartridge housing) to be unscrewed and removed for future replacement of the filter cartridge. A mounting bracket is an available accessory for most water filters and we suggest a mounting bracket be used to prevent unnecessary weight or torque that can be potentially applied to the supply piping.

For ease of installation, unscrew and remove the filter sump from the top of the filter and use the top containing inlet and outlet ports of the filter. Before you turn off the main water supply to your house, turn off any electric water heater you may have on the water system. Turn off the main water supply.

You may need to put the main water supply pipe to the house in order to put the filter in. Since you will be re-assembling the filter to the main pipeline you will need some type of swivel connection because the piping on both ends will be ridged and fixed in place. A "union" fitting may be used or if you have enough space available then "stainless steel water connectors" can make your installation much easier. A "union" or "stainless steel water connector" will only be needed on one side of the filter housing. You may choose to use one on each side if you prefer. If using one on the inlet side of the filter, then we suggest you install it after the ball valve (if a ball valve will be used). This will make it easier to disassemble the filter in the future, if needed.

Attach the mounting bracket to the top of the water filter. Tighten the screw/bolts snugly, but do not over-tighten into the top of the water filter. Connect the incoming pipe to the inlet side of the filter. If a ball valve will be used, then connect the ball valve to the main line piping. Install a union or stainless steel connector at this point if using on the inlet side. Now connect the ball valve to the inlet of the filter. The inlet and outlet of the filter housing is threaded female pipe thread and pipe thread compound needs to be applied to the male pipe threads of the pipe adapter or threaded nipple being used. Tighten snugly into the filter and be careful not to over tighten or you may crack the filter inlet socket.

Connect the filter outlet to the pipe continuing on to the house. Again, the inlet and outlet of the filter housing is threaded female pipe thread and pipe thread compound needs to be applied to the male pipe threads of the pipe adapter or threaded nipple being used. Tighten snugly into the filter and be careful not to over tighten or you may crack the filter outlet socket.

If a ball valve will be used on the outlet side of the water filter, then connect the ball valve to the main pipeline continuing on to the house, and then connect the union or stainless steel connector between the water filter and the ball valve.
Once you have checked to make sure all your connections are tightened correctly you will be ready to attach the sump and the filter cartridge to the installed top portion of the filter. Make sure the threads on the sump and the top portion are clean and free of any dirt or debris. Make sure the o-ring seal is properly lubricated. Use a quality lubricant designed for o-rings. We recommend SuperLube.

Install the filter cartridge by putting it into the sump housing and threading the sump housing into the "top" of the filter housing. Do not over-tighten, just make sure it is snug.

You are now ready to turn your main water slowly back on. Once you have turned the main water on, turn on the cold side of your kitchen faucet, or the faucet at the highest elevation in your house, to let any air in the water system escape. Once the water runs freely from the spout, not "spurting" or "spitting", the air has been expelled and you are safe to turn back on any electric water heater you may have turned off.

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